LISTED STONES

1 MILESTONE, A682 (SD 8279 4753)

18th Century. Inscriptions now partly illegible.
Left hand face reads 'To Burnley 8 miles'
Right hand face reads 'To Clithero 5ms, [Gis]born I m’

1 Milestone LH face   1 Milestone RH face

2 MILESTONE, A682 (SD 8463 4465)

Probably early 19th Century.
Left hand face inscribed 'To Gisburn 3 miles'
Right hand face inscribed 'To Burnley 9 miles'

2 Milestone LH face   2 Milestone RH face

3 BOUNDARY STONE, A682 (SD 8541 4399)

19th Century.
Left hand face inscribed 'Middop'
Right hand face inscribed 'Brogden
No picture available (August 2020)

4 MILESTONE, A682 (SD 8285 4717)

Probably early 19th Century.
Left hand face inscribed 'To Burnley 11 miles'
Right hand face inscribed 'To Gisburn I mile'

4 Milestone LH face   4 Milestone RH face

 

5 MILESTONE (SD 8384 4600)

Probably early 19th Century.
Left hand face inscribed 'To Burnley 10 miles'
Right hand face inscribed 'To Gisburn 2 miles'

5 Milestone LH face   5 Milestone RH face

STONES NOT LISTED

6 BOUNDARY STONE, A682 (SD 8411 4573)

Date not known
Left hand face inscribed 'Middop'
Right hand face inscribed 'Rimington'
(At July 2020 this stone is in the ground the wrong way round)

6 Boundary Stone LH face   6 Boundary Stone RH face

7 BOUNDARY STONE, A682 (SD 8284 4786)

Date not known
Left hand face inscribed 'Gisburn'
Left hand face inscribed 'Rimington'
No picture available (August 2020)

8 BOUNDARY BETWEEN LANCASHIRE AND YORKSHIRE ON DOWNHAM BRIDGE (SD 7885 4518)

Although not strictly a boundary stone, the carving in the parapet at Downham Bridge shows the boundary between Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire until the local government changes in 1974. This change inspired Christine Thistlethwaite to write the first of her dialect poems ‘’A Yorkshire Lad’s Lament’’, which is available to be heard in Christine’s section of the website.

8 Boundary between Lancs and Yorks

TROUGHS

Horses and drovers’ animals would be able to drink from the few stone troughs situated about the vicinity when they did not take the opportunity when fording becks and streams. Newby’s double trough was built in the 1890s. The tap above the trough on the roadside provided water to the inhabitants and a through-pipe let water flow to the field-side trough for the farm animals.  The trough near Halsteads Farm once stood further along the roadside, and was supplied with a steady trickle of water through its eye-catching arched iron spout. Other troughs about the parish include one on Martin Top Lane, another at the bottom of Howgill, and one near New House, Middop.

9 Halsteads (SD 8088 4606)

Trough in 2009, before it was moved

9 Halsteads trough in 2009 before it was moved

10 Howgill (SD 8252 4600)

10 Howgill trough

11 Martin Top (SD 8213 4561)

11 Martin Top Lane trough

12 Newby (SD 8164 4594)

12 Newby trough field side   12 Newby trough road side

13 New House (SD 8428 4526)

13 New House trough